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Federal Budget – superannuation flexibility

The Budget has made changes that reflect that the current superannuation system is at a kilter with individuals current lifestyles, with the introduction of more flexibility to address this.

Concessional contributions
Individuals under the age of 75 will now be able to claim tax deductions for personal superannuation contributions. From 1 July 2017, individuals can make concessional super contributions up to the concessional cap. This will benefit partially self-employed individuals and partially wage and salary earners whose employers do not offer salary sacrificing.

The Budget will improve the superannuation balances of low-income spouses as the current spouse tax offset is extended to assist more families in accumulating superannuation. The current income threshold for the receiving spouse (whether married or de facto) will be lifted from $10,800 to $37,000.

A contributing spouse will be eligible for an 18 per cent offset worth up to $540 for contributions made to an eligible spouse’s superannuation account.

Catch-up concessional superannuation contributions will be introduced to allow those with lower contributions and interrupted work patterns to make ‘catch-up’ payments to boost their nest egg. This will apply to those with account balances of $500,000 or less whereby allowing unused concessional contribution caps to be carried forward on a rolling basis for up to five years.

Contribution rules removed for older Australians
Australians aged 65 to 74 will be able to access the bring-forward of non-concessional contributions, minimum work requirements for voluntary superannuation contributions and restrictions on spouse contribution from 1 July 2017. The incentive is to assist older Australians to make superannuation contributions appropriate to their circumstances.

Retirement income products
Barriers are being removed to endorse innovation in the creation of retirement income products. These income products can enhance the flexibility and choice for retirees to better manage risk and improve their standard of living in retirement.

From 1 July 2017, the tax exemption on earnings in the retirement phase will be extended to products such as deferred lifetime annuities and group self-annuitisation products.

Posted on 4 May '16 by , under Super.

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Transition to retirement

The transition to retirement (TTR) strategy allows you to access some of your super while you continue to work.

You are able to use the TTR strategy if you are aged 55 to 60. You can use it to supplement your income if you reduce your work hours or boost your super and save on tax while you keep working full time.

  • Starting a TTR pension: To start your TTR pension, transfer some of your super to an account-based pension. You have to keep some money in your super account so that you can continue to receive your employer's compulsory contributions as well as any voluntary contributions you may be making.
  • Government benefits and TTR: The benefits you or your partner receive might be impacted if you choose to opt for this strategy. How and what exactly will change might become clearer upon discussing this with a Financial Information Service (FIS) officer.
  • Life insurance and TTR: In some cases, the life insurance cover you have with your super may stop or reduce if you start a TTR pension – check this before making any decisions or changes.

TTR can help ease your mind as you transition into retirement but it can be a bit complex. Before you choose whether you want to use TTR to reduce work hours or save on tax, or even if you want to use TTR altogether, you should figure out how this will impact all aspects of your finances.

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