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Increase in Australian business fraud

Australian businesses have lost $373 million dollars due to major fraud in the past 2 years, a three-fold increase in the past 15 years, yet are lagging behind addressing fraudulent behaviour as a serious issue.

There has also been an 82% increase in individual cases of fraud exceeding $1 million, with the finance sector hit the worst, according to an Australia wide survey on fraud conducted by KPMG.

Despite evidence of its continuing problem, only 15% saw fraud as a key risk in their business.

Those most likely to commit fraud tend to have been with the company for a long time, with 91% having a known history of fraud and 82% earning close to $100,000.

The survey also addressed the time it takes fraud to be detected, with an average of 665 days passing before an incident is reported or identified by a business.

The most common fraud methods, according to the survey, included false invoicing, theft of cash and fraudulent tendering. But technology is also playing a bigger part in fraud cases as hackers become more adept at cyber attacking company networks.

1. Australian businesses have lost $373 million dollars due to major fraud in the past 2 years, a three-fold increase in the past 15 years, yet are lagging behind addressing fraudulent behaviour as a serious issue.

There has also been a 82% increase in individual cases of fraud exceeding $1million, with the finance sector hit the worst, according to a Australia wide survey on fraud conducted by KPMG.

Despite evidence of its continuing problem, only 15% saw fraud as a key risk in their business.

Those most likely to commit fraud tended to have been with the company for a long time, with 91% having a known history of fraud and 82% earning close to $100,000.

The survey also addressed the time it takes fraud to be detected, with an average of 665 days passing before an incident is reported or identified by a business.

The most common fraud methods, according to the survey, include false invoicing, theft of cash and fraudulent tendering. But technology is also playing a bigger part in fraud cases as hackers become more adept at cyber attacking company networks.

Posted on 27 February '13 by , under General News.

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The transition to retirement (TTR) strategy allows you to access some of your super while you continue to work.

You are able to use the TTR strategy if you are aged 55 to 60. You can use it to supplement your income if you reduce your work hours or boost your super and save on tax while you keep working full time.

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TTR can help ease your mind as you transition into retirement but it can be a bit complex. Before you choose whether you want to use TTR to reduce work hours or save on tax, or even if you want to use TTR altogether, you should figure out how this will impact all aspects of your finances.

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