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Travels with my SMSF

Travelling overseas for an extended period of time is an exciting adventure and a chance to have a break. However, SMSFs do not take a break when you do, which is why it is important to ensure everything remains in line while you are away. SMSFs that breach the residency rules are taxed at the marginal rate of 49% rather than the concessionary rate of 15%. Before travelling, trustees must consider the implications to their SMSF.

Fund recognised as an Australian fund:
The SMSF will be recognised as an Australian super fund provided that the setup of and initial contributions have been made and accepted by the trustees in Australia, however, the trust deed does not have to be signed and executed in Australia. An SMSF that has been established outside Australia will also satisfy the test if at least one of the fund’s assets are located in Australia.

Management and control of the fund carried out in Australia:
The central management and control of the fund must usually be in Australia. This means the SMSF’s strategic decisions are regularly made, and high-level duties and activities are performed in Australia, such as formulating the investment strategy, reviewing the performance of the fund’s investments and determining how assets are to be used for member benefits. Generally, funds will meet this condition even if its central management and control is temporarily outside Australia for up to two years.

Active member test:
An “active member” is a contributor to the fund or contributions to the fund have been made on their behalf. To satisfy this test, the fund will need to have active members who are Australian residents and hold at least 50% of the total market value of the fund’s assets attributable super interests, or the sum of the amounts that would be payable to active members if they decided to leave the fund.

Posted on 30 October '19 by , under Super.

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What to consider when consolidating your super

The ATO reported that 45% of working Australians were not aware that they had multiple super accounts in 2016. Having multiple super accounts is particularly common for individuals who have had more than one job. If this is you, it is important to identify and manage your super accounts because having more than one can be costly as a result of account fees from multiple funds.To combat this, you may want to consolidate your super, which moves all your super into one account. Not only does this save on fees, but it also makes your super easier to manage and keep track of.

Before consolidating your super, it is important to do the following:

Research your funds' policy
Compare your active super accounts so you can make the right choice about which one you should close. Things to assess include:

  • Exit fees
  • Insurance policies
  • Investment options
  • Ongoing service fees
  • Performance of the funds

Check employer contributions
Changing funds may affect how much your employer contributes, as some employers contribute more to certain funds. Check your current accounts to see if changing funds will affect this. Once you have selected a super fund, regardless of whether you choose a new super fund or one of your existing ones, provide your employer with the details they need to pay super into your selected account.

Gather the relevant information
When consolidating your super, you will need to have the following details ready:

  • Your tax file number.
  • Proof of identity. This could include your driver's license, birth certificate or passport.
  • Your fund's superannuation product identification number (SPIN).
  • Your fund's unique superannuation identifier (USI).
  • Details of your previous fund.

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